Into the faculties #1

University College

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In the faculties #1

University College

1-1 intro

From Zernike to the city centre, from UMCG to Leeuwarden: the RUG has eleven faculties, but what is it really like to study and work in each one? In the photo feature ‘In the Faculties’, the UK is finding out.
Text and photos by Traci White

Photo cover: Lights come on in offices at UCG’s building as employees get ready to go home at the end of the day on Tuesday.

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Even though its name may suggest that it is a separate entity, University College Groningen is the tenth faculty at the RUG. But it is its own little world in a way: in its first three years of existence, the liberal arts programme has yet to have a cohort of students more than 100. This year’s cohort of 86 students is by far the largest: there were 26 students in the faculty’s first year and 25 in the second year.

While those class sizes are below the faculty’s goals for recruitment, having so few classmates and living together has created deep friendships among the students. Third-year students who returned from spending their fall semester abroad greeted one another with fierce hugs and played with each other’s hair as they saw each other again for the first time for a reunion dinner at UCG last week.

In various lounges and dining spaces, the small cohorts of students have their choice of leather couches to sprawl on for studying, booths for doing group work and a standing piano to play to entertain themselves in between classes, ranging from programming to political science to biology. After class, the first-year students head home to Frascati, where they are only required to live until their second academic year. Eventually, the classes and living accommodations may be side by side near the RUG’s new Healthy Ageing Campus, but for now, the students do not hide their pride in calling UCG home.

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Cyntha Wieringa walks down the main staircase in the UCG, past photos of the first three cohorts of the university college. The first year’s group consisted of 26 students, and the second group was even smaller with only 25 new enrolments. This year’s class had 86 students when courses began in the fall.

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Lisa Aardewijn, a first-year student at UCG, asks for clarification from her instructor. She says that she enjoys living together with her classmates at Frascati and thinks it’s a shame that the students can choose to live elsewhere after their first year.
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Elke Noens is reflected in a large television screen while giving a biochemistry lesson at UCG.
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Around lunchtime, students gather for group work in a lounge area inside the UCG building on the Hoendiepkade.
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Anna-Lotte Reitsma studies on a leather couch in a lounge space at UCG.
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Kevin Haines, a former UCG staff member, takes a break in the teacher’s lounge while visiting the faculty for the International Classroom project on Tuesday.
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Hozan Rashid (left) and Maarten Trips walk down the main staircase inside the University College building after a day of classes.
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Cairo Geha (left) plays with Cyntha Wieringa’s hair while Tamara Uildriks looks on in the dining room space at UCG.
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Third-year students mill around one of the lounge spaces on the ground floor at UCG before a meal welcoming them back from spending the fall semester abroad.
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A student bikes home to the Frascati student house from the UCG building. Frascati (which used to be a part of the KPN offices next door to the Central Station in Groningen) is about five minutes from their campus by bike and is shared with international students who are housed by SSH.
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Isabella Antonyan (centre) laughs over dinner while her classmates prepare meals in one of the kitchens in a common room on the third floor of the Frascati student house. First-year students at UCG live together in the SSH-operated building: the residential side of the university college approach means that the students are together both inside and outside the classroom.
Mobile version
From Zernike to the city centre, from UMCG to Leeuwarden: the RUG has eleven faculties, but what is it really like to study and work in each one? In the photo feature ‘In the Faculties’, the UK is finding out.
Text and photos by Traci White

Even though its name may suggest that it is a separate entity, University College Groningen is the tenth faculty at the RUG. But it is its own little world in a way: in its first three years of existence, the liberal arts and sciences programme has yet to have a cohort of students more than 100. This year’s cohort of 86 students is by far the largest: there were 26 students in the faculty’s first year and 25 in the second year.

While those class sizes are below the faculty’s goals for recruitment, having so few classmates and living together has created deep friendships among the students. Third-year students who returned from spending their fall semester abroad greeted one another with fierce hugs and played with each other’s hair as they saw each other again for the first time for a reunion dinner at UCG last week.

In various lounges and dining spaces, the small cohorts of students have their choice of leather couches to sprawl on for studying, booths for doing group work and a standing piano to play to entertain themselves in between classes, ranging from programming to political science to biology. After class, the first-year students head home to Frascati, where they are only required to live until their second academic year. Eventually, the classes and living accommodations may be side by side near the RUG’s new Healthy Ageing Campus, but for now, the students do not hide their pride in calling UCG home.

Cyntha Wieringa walks down the main staircase in the UCG, past photos of the first three cohorts of the university college. The first year’s group consisted of 26 students, and the second group was even smaller with only 25 new enrolments. This year’s class had 86 students when courses began in the fall.

Lisa Aardewijn, a first-year student at UCG, asks for clarification from her instructor. She says that she enjoys living together with her classmates at Frascati and thinks it’s a shame that the students can choose to live elsewhere after their first year.

Elke Noens is reflected in a large television screen while giving a biochemistry lesson at UCG.

Around lunchtime, students gather for group work in a lounge area inside the UCG building on the Hoendiepkade.

Anna-Lotte Reitsma studies on a leather couch in a lounge space at UCG.

Kevin Haines, a former UCG staff member, takes a break in the teacher’s lounge while visiting the faculty for the International Classroom project on Tuesday.

Students walk down the main staircase inside the University College building after a day of classes.

Cairo Geha (left) plays with Cyntha Wieringa’s hair while Tamara Uildriks looks on in the dining room space at UCG.

Third-year students mill around one of the lounge spaces on the ground floor at UCG before a meal welcoming them back from spending the fall semester abroad.

A student bikes home to the Frascati student house from the UCG building. Frascati (which used to be a part of the KPN offices next door to the Central Station in Groningen) is about five minutes from their campus by bike and is shared with international students who are housed by SSH.

Isabella Antonyan (centre) laughs over dinner while her classmates prepare meals in one of the kitchens in a common room on the third floor of the Frascati student house. First-year students at UCG live together in the SSH-operated building: the residential side of the university college approach means that the students are together both inside and outside the classroom.

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