Libraries and museums to reopen on Thursday

Libraries and museums to reopen on Thursday

Publicly accessible buildings like libraries, museums, and movie theatres will be allowed to reopen on 19 November, prime minister Mark Rutte announced in a press conference on Tuesday evening.
18 November om 11:31 uur.
Laatst gewijzigd op 22 November 2020
om 16:22 uur.
November 18 at 11:31 AM.
Last modified on November 22, 2020
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Door Yelena Kilina

18 November om 11:31 uur.
Laatst gewijzigd op 22 November 2020
om 16:22 uur.
Yelena Kilina

By Yelena Kilina

November 18 at 11:31 AM.
Last modified on November 22, 2020
at 16:22 PM.
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Swimming pools are allowed to reopen and group sports lessons may resume as well. The partial lockdown in the Netherlands will remain in place until at least mid-December, however. People are now allowed to receive three visitors per day and a maximum of four people from different households can be out in public together. Restaurants and pubs will remain closed and public events are still banned. 

Masks mandatory

Wearing face masks in public spaces will be mandatory starting December 1. Higher education students will have to wear masks around university facilities, but not in classrooms. Until now, wearing a mask has been merely ‘urgently recommended’.

Additionally, per December 1, people who are notified by the CoronaMelder tracking app or the GGD health service that they have been in contact with someone who tested positive for the coronavirus will be able to get a test. They will first need to self-isolate for five days, however. If after that, the test comes back negative, they’re allowed to come out of isolation. 

Health minister Hugo de Jonge stated that there will be no mandatory vaccination against the coronavirus. ‘We will only use the vaccines if they prove to be effective and safe’, he said. Nevertheless, the government expects at least 70 percent of the population to be vaccinated. 

Holiday season 

It is still unclear what rules will be in place during the December festivities. The prime minister recommended that people shop for gifts alone and look for creative solutions in terms of home celebrations. ‘If the number of people gets too big, you can also spread out the festivities over several days’, he said. More information will follow around early December. ‘We shouldn’t give ourselves a third wave for Christmas’, added the health minister. 

Partial lockdown goes one step further, Dutch government announces

Partial lockdown goes one step further

On Tuesday evening, the Dutch government introduced stricter measures to curb the coronavirus, which will come into effect this Wednesday at 10 p.m. and will last until November 18. That’s in addition to the existing measures that will remain in place until mid-December.
4 November om 10:01 uur.
Laatst gewijzigd op 22 November 2020
om 16:22 uur.
November 4 at 10:01 AM.
Last modified on November 22, 2020
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Yelena Kilina

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4 November om 10:01 uur.
Laatst gewijzigd op 22 November 2020
om 16:22 uur.
Yelena Kilina

By Yelena Kilina

November 4 at 10:01 AM.
Last modified on November 22, 2020
at 16:22 PM.
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Prime minister Rutte and health minister De Jonge have said that 25 percent more people are expected to be hospitalised this autumn compared to the first wave last spring. ‘The current peak will be lower, but it will take longer.’ In order to avoid putting additional pressure on healthcare workers and in solidarity with those in need of regular healthcare, extra measures are necessary to slow down the spread of covid-19. 

Stay home

The Dutch government calls on everyone to stay at home as much as possible, meet fewer people and have fewer large gatherings. Hence, all publicly accessible buildings, such as libraries, museums, theaters, swimming pools, zoos and amusement parks will be closed for two weeks. 

Hairdressing salons and shops will stay open, but Rutte encouraged people to avoid ‘shopping for fun.’ Recognising the importance of physical activity, the cabinet will allow gyms to remain open. However, group classes will be cancelled. 

Enforcement 

The number of people allowed to meet up in public places will be reduced from four people to two, from different households. As for house gatherings, the maximum number of visitors per day will be reduced from three to two. The government warns that illegal parties and other antisocial behaviour will be punished more strictly from now on. ‘The majority of people are following the rules, so a small group of people cannot spoil it for everyone else’, said Rutte.

In addition, the option of a regional night-time curfew will be kept open depending on the numbers of cases in the most affected provinces. 

Look after each other

‘Christmas will be different this year’, said De Jonge. ‘But we are taking these measures now, so we can celebrate it with our loved ones in December.’ Since the world map is turned entirely orange or red now, the government also urges people not to travel abroad until mid-January.  

Rutte stressed that life will get more complicated for ‘for everyone, also youngsters, who deal with loneliness and depressive feelings’ in the coming two weeks. That is why he encourages people to keep an eye on each other. ‘A little bit of attention and interest can mean a lot’, said the prime minister. 

International staff meets up online to practice their Dutch

Native speakers volunteer as coaches

International staff meets up online to practice their Dutch

To ensure international staff and their partners can brush up their Dutch in the time of corona, Dual-Career Support has set up weekly online conversation meetings. ‘It helps me keep up my proficiency level.’
7 October om 15:18 uur.
Laatst gewijzigd op 22 November 2020
om 16:21 uur.
October 7 at 15:18 PM.
Last modified on November 22, 2020
at 16:21 PM.


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7 October om 15:18 uur.
Laatst gewijzigd op 22 November 2020
om 16:21 uur.
Yelena Kilina

By Yelena Kilina

October 7 at 15:18 PM.
Last modified on November 22, 2020
at 16:21 PM.
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Native speakers are often surprised when they hear Qing Gong, who works as a student counsellor at the Student Service Centre, speak Dutch. ‘They say they can hardly detect my accent’, says Qing, whose first language is Chinese. 

Qing took her first Dutch class about ten years ago, but she noticed ‘real progress’ only when she deliberately started speaking Dutch with her colleagues. ‘I can’t really write policy articles, but emails and communication with Dutch students and colleagues are no problem.’

When the coronavirus forced her office to move online, Qing missed interacting with people. ‘I missed the Dutch environment and I really wanted to practice my Dutch.’ When she found out about the Leer Beter Nederlands online conversation meetings organised by Dual-Career Support, she joined the group of a Dutch language coach and three internationals. Six months later, Qing is satisfied with the result. ‘It helps me keep up my proficiency level.’

Free of charge

‘It started as an initiative to connect internationals with each other during the lockdown’, says Dual-Career Support project leader Harrianne ter Meer. ‘We place them into small groups, so they can have informal conversations in Dutch with each other and with a native speaker of Dutch.’ The native speakers volunteer as language coaches, so all activities are free of charge. 

To join in, people need to be able to speak Dutch on a conversational level, which is around A2 or B1. ‘It’s not a lesson, so we focus on speech and pronunciation instead of grammar’, says language coach Silvia Huisman, who also works as an education counsellor at the university. ‘We’re not teachers, but we like language and we enjoy making people enthusiastic about learning Dutch.’

Integration 

‘The day before the meeting our coach usually sends us a topic for discussion, but we always end up talking about something completely different’, chuckles Floriane Wittner. It was only a year ago that she followed her boyfriend to Groningen from France. As the partner of a UG staff member, she joined the Dual-Career Support meetings and wasted no time boosting her Dutch. ’I had already studied Dutch at my university around ten years ago, so I wanted to pick it up again’, says Floriane. 

Do the meetings help her to improve her proficiency level? ’Definitely. We speak French at home and I speak French at work, so now at least once a week I get to speak Dutch’, she says. ‘I really try to practice it as much as I can. I feel it is the only way to integrate into life here.’

Qing agrees that immersing into a Dutch-speaking environment helps to break the language barrier. ‘People are afraid of making mistakes, but that’s the only way to learn the language. Once you get into the flow, you focus on the fact that you can communicate and that is motivating.’

International staff and their partners can now register for a new round of the weekly Dutch conversation meetings organised by Dual-Career Support.

Gucci! Learn to text like a Dutch student

What does that honeybee emoji mean?

Gucci! Learn to text like a Dutch student

You think you’ve nailed your first Dutch language course. Confidently, you scroll through your WhatsApp conversations until you’re suddenly stumped: what could your Dutch friends possibly mean by that honeybee emoji or the word ‘fittie’?
29 September om 16:54 uur.
Laatst gewijzigd op 22 November 2020
om 16:21 uur.
September 29 at 16:54 PM.
Last modified on November 22, 2020
at 16:21 PM.


Yelena Kilina

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29 September om 16:54 uur.
Laatst gewijzigd op 22 November 2020
om 16:21 uur.
Yelena Kilina

By Yelena Kilina

September 29 at 16:54 PM.
Last modified on November 22, 2020
at 16:21 PM.
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Don’t worry, we’ve got you covered. To get you texting like a native, check our glossary of text speak and slang terms you won’t find in a textbook!

Gucci
Not that Italian fashion brand most students probably can’t afford, but a way to confirm a statement or question, something like ‘good’ or ‘fine.’

Lama
Again, not anything to do with those fluffy relatives of alpaca. Lama is a contraction of ‘laat maar’, meaning ‘never mind’, and can be used on numerous occasions.

Naaier
Derived from ‘naaien’ or ‘to sew’, the word means somebody who screws you over. 

Fittie
Meaning ‘quarrel’ or ‘argument,’ the noun is a surprisingly popular term among students.

<o>
The honeybee emoji in response to an invitation might surprise those who see it for the first time. It is a sort of wordplay: Dutch for ‘bee’ is ‘bij,’ while ‘ik ben er bij’ means ‘I am in!’ So next time you are invited for a student party, just insert the honeybee emoji and you should be fine. 

Fissa
Speaking of student parties, you can’t go far in Groningen without knowing what it means!  Say ‘fissa’ if you are going out in the city centre or ‘huis fissa’ if you throw a house party.

Een bak trekken
Translated literally as ‘to pull a basket,’ this expression means ‘to chug’, signalling that you are finishing your drink, usually beer, in one go. 

Regelen
‘Regelen’ literally means ‘to arrange something,’ but that’s not exactly what students mean when they say it in a nightclub. Most likely, it stands for ‘making out’.

Prela
A contraction of ‘pre-relationship’: when you like each other, but it’s not a relationship just yet.

Osso
What is the best place to end up after surviving a Dutch night out and cycling with a woozy head? Surely, your own place, your home, your castle. 

Thuis-thuis
It means more than ‘house’, it is your parents’ house. That place that you couldn’t wait to escape from, which suddenly turned into your safe haven full of childhood memories and clean dishes. 

Sjaars
If you disagree with the previous statement, you must be a first-year student. As you might already have guessed, ‘sjaars’ means ‘freshers’.

What is slang?

So what is slang? Is it a lower level of language? According to language and society professor Janet Fuller, not at all. ‘It is a lexical variation, which is often creative and serves important social functions’, she says. It can create the identity the speaker is aiming for. Or it can be a sign of belonging to a particular group. ‘Sharing a way of speaking is a common way of showing solidarity.’ People of all ages can learn and use slang terms.

As for student language, it reflects concerns of a student population, like parties or words for different types of people they come into contact with.

However, slang users may be stigmatised. Just as regional dialect speakers or those with foreign accents, Fuller says. Nevertheless, new slang words are a part of the natural development of language. ‘Slang words either become dated and die out, or they become incorporated into more mainstream usage.’

How likely is ‘gucci’ to become mainstream? The professor expects it will come and go as quickly as many other in-group markers. ‘Especially if older people start to use them, they stop being, well, all that gucci.’

Lack of interest in internationalisation grants

Lack of interest in internationalisation grants

The budget for student organisations to promote internationalisation and inclusion is getting slashed this year. CUOS, the board that distributes the money, will reduce the total available amount by 5,000 euros because the money wasn’t used up the last few years.
14 September om 12:29 uur.
Laatst gewijzigd op 22 November 2020
om 16:21 uur.
September 14 at 12:29 PM.
Last modified on November 22, 2020
at 16:21 PM.


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14 September om 12:29 uur.
Laatst gewijzigd op 22 November 2020
om 16:21 uur.
Yelena Kilina

By Yelena Kilina

September 14 at 12:29 PM.
Last modified on November 22, 2020
at 16:21 PM.
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In 2019, thirty-three student organisations received a financial contribution amounting to 23,172 euros in total, CUOS’ annual report says. But in 2020, only twenty-three student organisations submitted an application, resulting in a total of 10,829 euros paid out to twenty organisations. CUOS has decided to cut this year’s internationalisation budget from 30,000 to 25,000 euros and to further reduce the amount of money available by 5,000 each year. The money is supplied by the UG.

Communication manager Sue Mae Klein stresses that CUOS is looking into new options for the grant. It’s currently used for events and activities, but also for the translation of official documents and student associations’ websites into English. ‘Many organisations have already done this’, she says, which is why there might be fewer applications.

Foundation grant

Another grant, aimed at setting up new international student organisations, has had no applications at all in 2020. It, too, will be reduced, from 2,000 to 1,500 euros. CUOS suspects all international organisations have been formally established by now. Klein explains the budget hasn’t been cut completely because ‘we believe that the use of the grant is a fluctuating process’. In 2019, a total of 1,265 euros was paid out to two organisations under the scheme.

CUOS does not explicitly raise awareness for its grants, admits Klein. ‘But all the important information is provided on our website and we are in close contact with the international student platform GISP to ensure that we are aware of how we can help internationally oriented organisations.’

Proactive

The student parties in the university council feel that CUOS should be more proactive in approaching associations about the subsidies. ‘Then applications might rise in the future’, says Rozemarijn Gierkink with Lijst Calimero. ‘5,000 euros less every year means the budget will be completely gone within five years. We don’t think the inclusion issues can be solved in five years.’ David Jan Meijer with De Vrije Student agrees that internationalisation is a process, so organisations will need less university money over time, ‘but we’re not there yet’. 

Christopher de Bruijn with the Studenten Organisatie Groningen (SOG), on the other hand, says that ‘CUOS is not trying to reduce or remove the subsidy’, but rather is revising it, to make sure that the money is spent more efficiently. ‘We want to start a conversation within the university to see where possible improvements can be made’, says Klein.

Joy is back in Groningen, no thanks to the GGD

Joy is back in Groningen, no thanks to the GGD

Health organisation GGD Drenthe still hasn’t apologised to Spanish medical student Joy Adekanmi for her ten-day stay in a Covid quarantine house, she says.

8 September om 13:50 uur.
Laatst gewijzigd op 22 November 2020
om 16:21 uur.
September 8 at 13:50 PM.
Last modified on November 22, 2020
at 16:21 PM.


Yelena Kilina

Door Yelena Kilina

8 September om 13:50 uur.
Laatst gewijzigd op 22 November 2020
om 16:21 uur.
Yelena Kilina

By Yelena Kilina

September 8 at 13:50 PM.
Last modified on November 22, 2020
at 16:21 PM.
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Joy has finally made it to her student house in Groningen. ‘It feels good not to be limited to one place’, says Joy. She has been able to catch up on her studies in the library. ‘I am still in shock, some moments. I wish the GGD took more responsibility for what happened.’ 

Ukrant reported last week that Joy was taken straight from Groningen Aiport Eelde to the quarantine house in Heerenveen, where the doors were locked behind her. The GGD personnel didn’t clarify that the stay was voluntary and she could have refused to come with them.  

Although they haven’t apologised for the misunderstanding, ‘they did ask me for a meeting’, Joy says, ‘so I could give them feedback on how to make the experience better in the future’. 

She hasn’t decided yet whether she will agree to a meeting. ‘In the end, the GGD didn’t even organise my transportation from the Covid house.’ It was a volunteer who drove Joy and another Spanish student to Groningen. 

Where can I get Dutch news?

Where can I get Dutch news?

You may wonder how you’ll stay up to date on the Dutch coronavirus measures, or perhaps you’d just like to know what’s happening in Groningen. If you want to keep yourself informed of current events, check these news sources, both in English and Dutch.
2 September om 10:09 uur.
Laatst gewijzigd op 22 November 2020
om 16:21 uur.
September 2 at 10:09 AM.
Last modified on November 22, 2020
at 16:21 PM.


Yelena Kilina

Door Yelena Kilina

2 September om 10:09 uur.
Laatst gewijzigd op 22 November 2020
om 16:21 uur.
Yelena Kilina

By Yelena Kilina

September 2 at 10:09 AM.
Last modified on November 22, 2020
at 16:21 PM.
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News from Groningen 

If you don’t speak Dutch or you’re still learning, you can find English-language news articles and background stories about Groningen (as well as Drenthe and Friesland) on the Northern Times website. There is even a section about international students, so you are definitely not alone here. 

If you’re of the opinion that the scope of local cultural life is commensurate with the size of the city, then check out Here & Now in Groningen. This events calendar lists everything from concerts and museum exhibitions to educational lectures and social gatherings.

All of the Netherlands

Want to look beyond Groningen? DutchNews.nl and NLTimes.nl provide summaries of all important Dutch news and report on current events in the Netherlands, from politics and society to sports and entertainment. Here, you will also find a frequently updated section with coronavirus information. 

Social media users can simply follow the NOS in English page on Facebook. Set up by Dutch students, it provides unofficial translations of news articles of the largest news organisation of the Netherlands, NOS. Even though the translated news is unauthorised and possible linguistic inaccuracies may occur here and there, it is a great student initiative you can use to your advantage. 

News in Dutch

If you prefer to practise your Dutch, you can start with media that is focused on life in the North. By reading the Dagblad van het Noorden newspaper or watching the RTV Noord television programmes, you will always stay up to date. Another way to keep up with local developments, celebrations, and measures is to follow the municipality of Groningen on social media. 

Life is not only about hard news of course! If you want to connect with local sports fans, check Sport in Stad. And culture lovers can keep up with the artsy events and activities via Filter Groningen

As for national news in Dutch, there are a ton of options, including NOS, de Volkskrant, NRC, Trouw, and many others. Oh, and don’t forget De Speld – its satirical articles parodying the trending news stories are a perfect gateway to understanding life in the Netherlands.  

‘FSE needs to hire more international support staff’

‘FSE needs to hire more international support staff’

The Faculty of Science and Engineering (FSE) risks losing international talents if it keeps insisting its support staff speak fluent Dutch, says faculty council member Marzia Nuzzolo. ‘There should be more support jobs available for non-Dutch speakers.’
7 July om 14:20 uur.
Laatst gewijzigd op 22 November 2020
om 16:21 uur.
July 7 at 14:20 PM.
Last modified on November 22, 2020
at 16:21 PM.


Yelena Kilina

Door Yelena Kilina

7 July om 14:20 uur.
Laatst gewijzigd op 22 November 2020
om 16:21 uur.
Yelena Kilina

By Yelena Kilina

July 7 at 14:20 PM.
Last modified on November 22, 2020
at 16:21 PM.
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Nuzzolo, an education and research officer, asked the faculty board in last week’s council meeting to reconsider whether a near-native level of Dutch is really necessary. ‘It is not something that would prevent supporting personnel from doing their job’, she says. 

According to her, the language barrier is ‘demotivating’ and some scientists leave the university or don’t accept an offer because their partners can’t find an English-language job. The language dilemma also applies to PhD students who have left research, but want to stay at the university. ‘It takes time to learn Dutch and FSE excludes a lot of talented people by requiring a C1 level at the outset.’ 

Fellow faculty council member and degree programme coordinator Eva Teuling supports Nuzzolo. Although FSE has a lot of international students and scientific staff, she says, ‘compared to the rest of the faculty, our support staff is not diverse’. She stresses that it’s too early to talk about opening English-language vacancies, though. ‘We’re still at step one.’

‘I think we would also like our staff to actually learn the Dutch language to some extent’, dean Jasper Knoester responded during the faculty council meeting. ‘It goes both ways, but I think it is a good point.’

‘Ik begrijp je niet’, the police said

Photo by Reyer Boxem

Harassed by a naked man

‘Ik begrijp je niet’, the police said

When international PhD student Gabriela was sexually harassed in the Nieuwe Boteringestraat, she tried calling the police. But the officer she spoke to couldn’t understand her. What if this happens again? Where does an international seek help?
1 July om 9:32 uur.
Laatst gewijzigd op 22 November 2020
om 16:21 uur.
July 1 at 9:32 AM.
Last modified on November 22, 2020
at 16:21 PM.


Yelena Kilina

Door Yelena Kilina

1 July om 9:32 uur.
Laatst gewijzigd op 22 November 2020
om 16:21 uur.
Yelena Kilina

By Yelena Kilina

July 1 at 9:32 AM.
Last modified on November 22, 2020
at 16:21 PM.
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She can still see him in her mind’s eye. Tall, white, well-dressed, in his mid-thirties. He was walking on the sidewalk at the Ossenmarkt at 2 a.m. on Saturday morning. He didn’t seem to pay any attention to her and it’s a fairly safe part of town, so she didn’t immediately think anything was amiss.

International PhD student Gabriela – not her real name – was on foot, too. She was walking her bike along because her chain had come off. ‘I was alone and couldn’t fix the bike in the dark, so I just walked.’ 

Naked

When she had reached the Nieuwe Kerk, she heard someone shout behind her. ‘Look at me!’ She turned, thinking it might be a friend of hers who lives nearby. But it wasn’t him. Instead the tall guy from before had come up next to her and he was completely naked. 

For a couple of seconds, Gabriela just froze. Then she turned away and started screaming for help. ‘I can hardly remember how I managed to get my phone’, she says. ‘But somehow I succeeded in calling a helpline, while running with my bike at the same time.’

Somehow I succeeded in calling a helpline while I was running with my bike

In her panic, she somehow dialled the American emergency number, but a recording told her to call 112. She tried again and was quickly connected to someone who asked her in English about her location and put her through to the Groningen police station. ‘I was so relieved I was no longer alone’, she says. Gabriela, who’s bilingual in English and her native language, automatically started recapping in English: ‘I am scared, I am on this street, there is a naked man, I need help.’ 

But the only thing the local police officer said was: ‘Ik begrijp je niet’ – I don’t understand you. ‘That made me feel even more scared, because now I couldn’t make myself clear to someone who could have possibly helped me.’ 

Dutch words

Frantically, she tried to put some words together in Dutch. ‘Ik loop naar mijn huis’ – I am walking home. ‘Er is een man’- There is a man. ‘Geen kleding’- No clothes. 

It was no use. The only thing she got from the policewoman was that she couldn’t understand Gabriela. ‘She said that she could hear I was panicking and that I was scared, but why didn’t she offer any assistance?’ 

Still, she stayed on the phone with the officer, so her location could be tracked if something happened. Only after she had arrived home and the policewoman had asked her if she still needed her did she break the connection. ‘It felt odd to continue speaking with her, so I put the phone down’, says Gabriela. 

Complaints  

It’s been almost two weeks since the incident, but Gabriela still isn’t over what happened. What if she hadn’t lived as close by as she did? ‘I don’t know how things would have gone.’

She doesn’t feel safe anymore, especially because the police didn’t try to find the offender. What if the guy lives nearby and she sees him again? What if he recognises her? Or if someone else gets harassed in the same way?  Why didn’t they do a search of the neighbourhood to find him?

Most importantly, who can she call next time she is in trouble?

I don’t know how things would have gone if I hadn’t lived close by

Gabriela filed two complaints with the police. One about the indecent exposure and the other about the fact that she was denied help. ‘The police officer I filed the complaint with was surprised at what had happened’, she says. ‘He said people in the police department are trained in English and Dutch. I was told that they can’t deny me assistance.’ 

But the fact remains that it did happen. 

Gabriela discovered that there was video surveillance on the street where the incident happened. Because she had ‘zero faith’ in the police following up, she went to the business that owned the camera herself and convinced an employee to check the video.  ‘He managed to catch the person on the video. He captured his face.’ Still, the police didn’t act. 

Self-defence 

‘If something like this happens again, I really wouldn’t know who to call for help’, Gabriela says. She is considering taking self-defence classes, so she can protect herself. ‘I can’t trust the police to come and help me next time.’

The police in Groningen have confirmed the incident has happened, but they won’t disclose details about the investigation because of privacy regulations. ‘We regularly receive calls from non-Dutch speakers, which we try to answer as professionally as we can’, says a spokesperson. Those who need a translator, however, can expect one only in ‘scheduled situations’.

If our assessment is that the situation is urgent, we always send police

In an emergency situation, the location of a mobile phone can indeed be tracked down, but it’s up to the police to decide whether to come or not. ‘If our assessment is that the situation is urgent, we would always send police to that location.’

‘I’m surprised they said their assessment of the situation was not urgent’, says Gabriela. She is still worried. She has been taking Dutch language classes on and off for two years, but when push came to shove, she still wasn’t able to communicate with the police. She’s heard stories of friends with similar issues. ‘I think many English speakers don’t feel that they are really being helped.’

Do you need help after sexual assault?

If you’re in immediate need of help, contact the Centrum Seksueel Geweld (Sexual Assault Centre) at 0800-0188 (available 24/7). They offer free specialist care to victims of sexual assault and rape. Slachtofferhulp (Victim Support Netherlands) provides emotional assistance, guides you through the criminal proceedings and can help you with compensation. They can tell you about what the police can do for you and where you can ask for further help, including legal assistance with a sex offence.

No exchange programmes for FEB students next semester

No exchange programmes for FEB students next semester

The Faculty of Economics and Business has cancelled all exchange programmes for the first semester of next academic year. This applies to both FEB students who want to study abroad and international exchange students who want to come here.
9 June om 13:20 uur.
Laatst gewijzigd op 22 November 2020
om 16:20 uur.
June 9 at 13:20 PM.
Last modified on November 22, 2020
at 16:20 PM.


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Door Yelena Kilina

9 June om 13:20 uur.
Laatst gewijzigd op 22 November 2020
om 16:20 uur.
Yelena Kilina

By Yelena Kilina

June 9 at 13:20 PM.
Last modified on November 22, 2020
at 16:20 PM.
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The faculty board has written its staff and students to say that there is too much uncertainty surrounding the timeline of the corona measures and the travel limitations between countries. Bachelor students who are doing an exchange minor as a mandatory part of their programme can expect alternative options. 

FEB students who are planning to study abroad in the second semester don’t have to change their plans just yet. The faculty will decide later whether the exchange programmes can resume then. 

Other UG faculties haven’t yet announced what will happen with their exchange programmes. The UG board has left it to each faculty to make their own decisions.